The Cashflow Hustle Podcast: Crowdfunding Techniques to Level Up Your Business

CFH47_Mark Roderick.png

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

Mark Roderick appeared on the Cashflow Hustle Podcast with Justin Grimes, where he discussed Crowdfunding Techniques to Level Up Your Business.

In this Episode, You’ll Learn About:

1. The Crowdfunding and its flavors
2. The deductions in Crowdfunding
3. The role of SEC
4. Blockchain technology in Crowdfunding
5. The Investor portals
6. Tokenized security in Crowdfunding

Questions? Let me know.

Why Title II Portals Will Also Become Title III Portals, And Vice-Versa

CF Portal Mall

Why has Home Depot made local hardware stores a thing of the past? Partly price, but mainly selection. And I think the same forces will require most Crowdfunding portals to offer investments under Title II, Title III, and Title IV, all at the same time.

Crowdfunding portals are like retail stores that sell securities. They have suppliers, which we call “sponsors” or “portfolio companies,” and they have customers, which we call “investors.” They pick the market they want to serve – hard money loans, for example – then try to stock their shelves with products from the best suppliers to attract the largest number of customers. Think of DSW, but selling securities rather than shoes.

Now consider these situations:

  • You’re a Title II portal and have established a relationship with Sandra Smith, a real estate developer you’ve learned to trust. She informs you she’d like to raise $30 million to build a shopping center in Chicago and needs to attract investors from the local community. You could tell her you only do Title II and send her across the street, but maybe she’ll find a competitor where she can get Title II and Title IV under one roof. So you’d really like to offering Title IV as well, which means attracting non-accredited investors.
  • You’re a Title II portal raising money for biotech. A company approaches you with a new therapy for cystic fibrosis. They have 117,000 Facebook followers and wide support in the cystic fibrosis community, and have already raised $30,000 in a Kickstarter campaign. They want to raise $800,000 for clinical tests, then come back and raise $5 million if the tests are successful. Sure, you could tell them to go somewhere else for the $800,000 raise and come back for the larger (and more profitable) $5 million round, but once they leave they’re probably not coming back.
  • You’re a Title III portal with lots of investors signed up. Turned away by the portal she’s used to working with, Sandra Smith asks for your help in the $30 million Title IV raise. Any reason to turn her down?

Those of us in the industry see Title II, Title III, and Title IV as separate things, but to the suppliers and customers of the industry they’re all the same thing. The differences between Title II and Title IV are nothing compared to the differences between sneakers and 6-inch heels! Yet DSW sells them both and everything in between because in the eyes of customers, they’re all shoes.

It doesn’t matter to suppliers and customers that Title II and Title III require different technology and business models. It doesn’t matter that one is more profitable than the other. Mercedes might lose money selling its lower-end cars but doesn’t mind doing so because customers who buy the lower-end Mercedes today buy the higher-end Mercedes 10 years from now. The Vanguard Group probably loses money on some of its funds but sells them anyway to keep customers in the fold. As the Crowdfunding market develops, I think the same will be true of the interplay with Title II, Title III, and Title IV.

For portals that have achieved success in Title II, it might be unwelcome news that Title II isn’t enough. But on the positive side, Fundrise has managed to leverage its reputation in Title II into a well-received REIT under Title IV. In any case, I think it’s inevitable.

Questions? Let me know.

How to Present Investor Disclosures in Crowdfunding Offerings (And How Not To)

Title II Crowdfunding is often referred to, more or less accurately, as “online private placements.” It’s time the industry turned the online, digital, aspect of the offerings more to its advantage.

Remember when newspapers first came online? Remember how interesting they were visually? I’m being sarcastic. They were nothing more than photographs of the paper version, failing to take advantage of the digital platform and its unique capabilities.

Too many (not all) Crowdfunding portals take the same approach to providing investor disclosures. You click through the process and suddenly see an enormous PDF document that is nothing more or less than a paper private placement memorandum, complete with Schedules and Exhibits. You’reOnline document supposed to scroll down and “sign” at the bottom. On some platforms the investor actually has to click I’m Ready to Invest before he sees the disclosures!

There are at least three things wrong with this approach:

• Investors can’t be happy with it.

• It doesn’t convey information effectively.

• The disclosure might be legally ineffective. I think about a plaintiff’s lawyer cross-examining the portal operator, pointing to a disclosure on page 67 and asking “Did you really expect my client to read all that at the end of the click-through process?”

It doesn’t have to be that way! There are much better ways to provide information online. Take a look at today’s online version of the New York Times or Wall Street Journal to see how far we’ve come.

Crowdfunding portals can do the same thing. The first step is to move the mental image of that paper PPM into Trash or the Recycle Bin (depending on whether you’re Mac or PC) and start from scratch. What are we trying to accomplish here? What are the tools at our disposal? Pose that question to some creative people and you’ll get a whole range of possibilities, all of them better for investor, sponsor, and portal.

Questions? Contact Mark Roderick.

REBUILDING AMERICA, BY JASON FRITTON, FOUNDER & CEO OF PATCH OF LAND

Statue of Lib CF_PurchasedBy: Jason Fritton, Founder & CEO of Patch of Land

Our headquarters is in Los Angeles, but Patch of Land was really born in Chicago.

Like all American cities, Chicago is a tale of two cities: one where the streets are lined with mansions, tidy row homes, and plush high-rises; and the other where most houses, if you can call them that, have boarded up windows, loose bricks, and rotting wood.

You can’t see those neighborhoods without wanting to help, and if you’re a real estate entrepreneur, as I am, you think there must be a lot of money to be made from all those vacant and abandoned buildings.

I went to foreclosure auctions but found that the market was broken. On one hand, the same handful of ultra-wealthy individuals or companies bid on $10 million properties. On the other hand, nobody bid on the smaller properties in blighted neighborhoods even though they could be had for a pittance, $10,000 or $20,000 apiece. The problem was (and is) that banks wouldn’t touch them, even if the developer had a proven track record. So the properties stayed vacant and abandoned, basically worthless, eyesores in the community.

I had a great idea – Crowdfunding! I’d ask for money from everyone. Not just as charity, although revitalizing neighborhoods would be the goal, but also as good investments for the donors/investors. We would start in Chicago and then move across the country, helping communities along the way.

We had our motto – Building Wealth & Growing Communities – before we knew how we were going to do it.

As it turned out I was a little early. I wanted to advertise my investments to everyone but in securities law terms that would have been “general solicitation,” which was still illegal. To keep my idea alive I found myself in Washington, D.C. lobbying for the JOBS Act, where I learned how political compromise can work. Republicans liked the economic freedom the bill gave to entrepreneurs and individual investors, while Democrats liked the potential for improving neighborhoods and the boost for small business.

Both sides came together and President Obama signed the bill into law on April 5, 2012. Now, without going to jail, I could start improving those neighborhoods.

There is an old African proverb: “If you want to go quickly, go alone.  If you want to go far, go together.” I started building my team piece by piece, knowing a lot of other smart people were getting into the market at the same time. And I’m proud of the team I built, the best in the business as far as I’m concerned. We did our first deal on October 15, 2013 and within six were the leading platform in the country dedicated to real estate debt.

We pre-fund all our deals, meaning we invest our own money before asking for money from anyone else. Unlike some other platforms, we also start paying interest as soon as we take an investor’s money. We are completely transparent. We charge no fees to investors. We offer very fast turnarounds to borrowers and very competitive returns to investors. We do a great job evaluating loans, based on our credit experience to date. We’ve taken big steps toward bridging the gap between the old world of behind-closed-doors capital formation, and the new world of online transparent capital structures.

But they’re just first steps. We and the industry have a long way to go. More than anything, we need a workable Title III or its equivalent. Accredited investors, all eight and a half million of them, make up only a small fraction of American adults. To truly democratize the formation of capital, we need to let everyone into the game.

Less than a year after Title II came into effect the market is exploding, with some very large real estate players getting into the business. To me, that’s just vindication of our business model, proof that the Crowdfunding business is being taken seriously.

I don’t worry much about the competition from those companies because small, nimble companies like Patch of Land enjoy a bunch of advantages:

  • Crowdfunding is a new business. Those of us who have been here from the start know the business inside out.
  • There’s a reason Walmart can’t seriously challenge Amazon. Amazon’s business was built online from the ground up, while Walmart’s entire model, entire way of thinking, is based on bricks and mortar. For more on that, click here.
  • Our business runs on technology, and our technology is second to none. In one seamless, integrated process, we control a project from application to interest-paying loan.
  • Our cost structure is far lower, allowing us to share the savings with both borrowers and investors.
  • There are wide swaths of the American real estate market the big players have never touched and will never touch. We call that market “under-served” or “most of America.” That’s the market Crowdfunding was created to address.

Among the many transactions we’ve complete, our loan to Deborah Smith in Georgia shows what we’re about. Deborah developed a rent-to-own program where veterans with poor credit could qualify for financing from the Veterans’ Administration. Using financing from Patch of Land, she was able to get those veterans in homes they couldn’t afford otherwise. And our investors made money in the propatch of landcess. That’s a long way from solving every problem in the real estate market, but it’s a start.

I’m super optimistic about the future of Patch of Land. If you had told me five years ago that I could be doing what I’m doing today, I’d have thought you were dreaming. Wait until you see what we’ve built five years from now.

Follow Jason Fritton on Twitter: @JasonFritton

Follow Patch of Land on Twitter: @PatchOfLand

 

CROWDFUNDING AND THE LIFE SCIENCES: AN EVENING WITH THE EXPERTS

Last night I had the honor of moderating an all-star panel hosted by Pharmaceutical Consulting Consortium International (PCCI) in Philadelphia, focused on Crowdfunding in the life science space.

Our panelists:

  • Don Skerrett, the President of PCCI and a serial entrepreneur, who spoke from the perspective of an early-stage life science CEO
  • Barbara Schilberg, an experienced life science investor, the CEO of BioAdvance, a leading life science fund that has invested in almost 60 companies – leading to $1.7 billion of additional financing – and a senior executive in four active life science businesses
  • Darrick Mix, a shareholder at Duane Morris and an expert in Federal and State securities laws
  • Samuel Wertheimer, the Chief Investment Officer at Poliwogg, a Title II portal devoted to the health care industry and one of the most exciting and innovative portals of any kind in the world

Among the issues discussed:

  • The advantages and disadvantages of Crowdfunding from the perspective of a life science company
  • The nuts-and-bolts mechanics of Crowdfunding
  • The role of portals
  • The due diligence process for life science companies
  • The legal liability of life science companies and portals
  • The effect of Crowdfunding on the life science market specifically and the capital formation industry generally

The panel agreed that while Crowdfunding in the real estate market is very active, with more than 100 real estate portals already in operation, Crowdfunding in the life science market is at a very early stage. How the market will develop, how much capital it will provide to life science companies, how existing capital sources like BioAdvance will coordinate with new capital sources like Poliwogg, whether the life science market will divide into sectors as the real estate market is doing – these questions are all unanswered. But the panel also agreed that Crowdfunding holds great opportunities for the life science sector even if the details have yet to be worked out.

Thanks to those who attended, to PCCI for making the event possible, and especially to our excellent panelists for making the event so informative and worthwhile.

Questions? Contact Mark Roderick.